What I’m Reading 

I’m reading the historical romance A Counterfeit Betrothal by Mary Balogh right now. It’s one of Balogh’s early books, so it’s a little repetitive. The characters are engaging, though. I’m looking forward to reading her more recent books!

Upcoming Reads

Some of my upcoming reads are:

Herland and Other Selected Stories, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, edited by Barbara H. Solomon: Picked up at  a bookstore in Maine.  I read the famous story “The Yellow Wallpaper” back in high school. I’m interested in reading more of her works!

Highland Scandal by Julia London: Another historical romance read from a used bookstore. It looks fun!

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen: I realized back in August during #AusteninAugustRBR 2015, this is the only main Austen novel I didn’t own. Now I do!

Hollow City (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #2) by Ransom Riggs: A pick for a Weird Wednesday post. I also own and enjoyed the first book in this YA fantasy series, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.

Harness the Sun: America’s Quest for a Solar-Powered Future by Philip Warburg: A book I received from LibraryThing Early Reviewers in August or early September, and accidentally forgot to review before it was released.

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#AusteninAugustRBR 2015: Lady Susan & Wrap Up

Northanger Abbey, Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sanditon

Oxford World’s Classics edition, 2003 (Oxford University Press)

Paperback

Source: Personal copy

I wasn’t in the mood for Northanger Abbey after all, so I decided to read Austen’s unfinished works. I only got as far as Lady Susan, which was finished but unpublished.

I like to read the introduction to classic novels before I read them to get some context. This edition’s introduction (and notes) is by Claudia L. Johnson. According to the introduction, a novel in letters was considered a classic novel when Austen began this in the 1790s. She wondered what the scheming villian of Clarissa would be like as a woman. Lady Susan tricks the Vernon family into giving her money, while writing to her confidante about how awesome she is at tricking people. Catherine Vernon knows about her reputation, and therfore suspects Lady Susan of not being sincere. Catherine describes her terrible behavior in letters to her mother.

Writing an epistolary novel was difficult for Austen, as she ends the story with a third-person “Conclusion.” If the same story was in third person, it probably would have focused on Catherine knowing her husband was being duped, and being powerless to stop it until the end. Overall, I liked this story.

           Wrap-Up

I enjoyed my first Austen in August! Even though I didn’t enter any giveaways, I liked reading other people’s posts on Austen and her works. I’m looking forward to sharing more thoughts next year!